美女视频黄频大全视频

Occupy White Walls: Free Video Game Lets You Design Your Own Virtual Art Gallery

Occupy White Walls, Kickstarter
Occupy White Walls, Kickstarter

Museums around the world have been closed for weeks in light of the COVID-19 crisis, and art lovers are craving culture any way they can get it. If you've already remotely toured every exhibit that's available online, now you can build your own art gallery from scratch. As reports, Occupy White Walls is a free video game that allows you to curate the museum exhibits of your dreams at home.

美女视频黄频大全视频The game, now available to download on , lets you customize every element of your virtual gallery. You can model it after your favorite museum from real life—with marble floors and white walls—or take the design in a more creative direction. The museums can house indoor fields, float in the middle of bodies of water, or exist in space.

After building the structure itself, it's time to decide what to fill it with. The video game features a catalog of more than 6000 real-life artworks to display in your museum. If you're not sure where to start, the AI program Daisy will suggest pieces based on your personal taste. You also have the freedom to create custom mosaics, explores other players' galleries, and create collaborative designs in multiplayer mode.

Though an early version of Occupy White Walls is already available online, the game's creators hope to raise money to improve the game through . So far the team has raised more than $40,000 of its $122,869 goal, with the campaign set to end on April 28. You can back the Kickstarter today to get access to special in-game features.

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When Magic Eye Pictures Ruled the World—and Frustrated Millions of People

In the 1990s, millions of people spent a lot of time staring at images like this one.
In the 1990s, millions of people spent a lot of time staring at images like this one.
Amazon

美女视频黄频大全视频When Magic Eye creator Tom Baccei welcomed executives from General Mills to the offices of his N.E. Thing Enterprises company in 1994, he led them to a mock-up cereal advertisement he had his employees put together. The board a bowl of cereal and an ill-defined series of dots. When their eyes relaxed, the executives were able to make out the “hidden” message in the bowl: BUY ME.

“Oh, no, we can’t do that,” one executive said.

Baccei thought it was funny. By that point, his company needed no subliminal messaging in order to be successful. Sales of products featuring his wildly Magic Eye illustrations—which appeared to be two-dimensional abstract images until the viewer’s brain “switched” and perceived it as a three-dimensional image—were set to hit $100 million. Two Magic Eye books were on the New York Times美女视频黄频大全视频 bestseller list. Posters, coffee mugs, cards, games, and postcards were emblazoned with the optical effect. Soon, they’d be on boxes of Apple Cinnamon Cheerios, too. Baccei knew they were all staring at a fad, but he was determined to make the most of it.

The Magic Eye images were based on principles that stretched as far back as 1828, when English physicist Sir Charles Wheatstone a device called the stereoscope that could merge two images together to create the illusion of depth. The trick amused royalty like Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. In 1959, a cognitive psychologist named Béla Julesz was able to take these illustrations, known as single image random dot stereograms, and make them visible美女视频黄频大全视频 to the naked eye. To achieve this, Julesz created one image of uniform, randomly distributed dots. One circular space would be shifted slightly in a second image. When viewed side-by-side, a circle appeared to “float” above the background. Julesz proved depth perception was a function of the brain, not the eye.

This stereopsis, or 3D effect, works because the brain essentially marries the two of them together to avoid experiencing double vision. Further work by visual neuroscientist Christopher Tyler in the 1970s condensed the illusion to a single image. But it would be Baccei who would turn this clever sleight of sight into a national phenomenon.

In the 1970s, Baccei was a bus driver for Green Tortoise, a purported “hippie” transportation company. He eventually moved on to work for Pentica Systems, a computer hardware company located just outside of Boston, Massachusetts. There, Baccei was tasked with advertising a MIME in-circuit emulator, which helped debug computer systems. Perhaps inevitably, he hired a mime for the ad.

The performer, Ron Labbe, happened to be a 3D photography enthusiast and brought along a stereo camera. When Baccei asked where he could get more information about the hobby, Labbe directed him to Stereo World magazine. There, Baccei saw one of the single image random dot stereograms and was amused by the visual trick. While it appeared to be nothing more than television static, focusing on it revealed circles and dots.

He decided to design one for Pentica, which “hid” the model number of a new product in the dotted image and prompted readers to contact them for a prize if they could see it. The ad became so popular that readers tore the page out of the magazine and pinned it up in offices or faxed it to associates.

Believing he was on to something, Baccei partnered with graphic artist Cheri Smith, who helped him create more involved images on a computer instead of the generic clip art he had been using. A Pentica co-worker named Bob Salitsky was able to refine the dots for a sharper image. Look at a picture of some tropical fish, for example, and a fish tank would appear. By 1991, Baccei was working on his own start-up, N.E. Thing Enterprises, and taking assignments for the illustrations. One of the images appeared in the American Airlines magazine American Way, where it caught the eye of Japanese businessmen. Soon, Baccei was working with Tenyo Co. Limited on a series of books and posters. While Baccei called the pictures Stare-e-os, the Amazing 3D Gaze Toys, the Japanese sold the images under the name Magic Eye.

美女视频黄频大全视频That in-flight image also caught the attention of Mark Gregorek, a licensing agent who approached Baccei and told him there was incredible potential for partnering with other companies to create more Magic Eye content. Gregorek secured a deal with book publisher Andrews McMeel in 1993 as well as a variety of other licensees. Magic Eye was positioned to take off in America, though it’s not likely anyone anticipated what happened next.

A 2015 Magic Eye calendar is pictured
Magic Eye was licensed out for dozens of products, including calendars.
Amazon

After an initial 30,000 print run of the $12.95 Magic Eye book collection sold out, Andrews McMeel distributed 500,000 more copies. Both Magic Eye and Magic Eye II became bestsellers. N.E. Thing Enterprises—which officially changed its name to Magic Eye in 1996—made deals with many other companies for postcards, posters, a syndicated comic strip, and 20 million boxes of cereal. Mall kiosks, which were actually the product of a rival company named NVision Grafix, saw scores of people staring intently at the stereogram images. If one member of the group suddenly “got it,” the others would continue glaring in frustration. Those who couldn’t see the image—which, by one estimate, was up to 50 percent of people—were to put their nose close to the surface but have their eyes aimed further away. By slowly moving the page away, an image of surprising depth would appear. Magic Eye and similar products became a social obsession.

As revenues surpassed $100 million, Baccei knew that he couldn’t hold everyone’s attention forever. Like the Pet Rock美女视频黄频大全视频, the Hula Hoop, and dozens of other fads, consumers would eventually have their attention diverted elsewhere. There were also the inevitable knock-offs, which might sell for as little as $5 for a poster compared to an official Magic Eye offering for $25. An attempt to humanize the pictures by having a corporate mascot, the wizard Wizzy Nodwig, failed to take off.

With business slowing in 1995, Baccei sold his portion of Magic Eye to graphic artist Smith and another partner, Andy Paraskevas. The company is still around, though it has refocused its attention on corporate clients who want to utilize the images for commercial purposes. You can check out images on their , but Magic Eye that the effect works best on the printed page.

Explore 4.5 Million Objects in the British Museum's Digital Archives

© The Trustees of the British Museum // CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
© The Trustees of the British Museum //

You don't have to wait until the British Museum in London reopens to explore its collections. As reports, the museum has uploaded nearly 4.5 million objects to its , and anyone is free to view and download them to create their own virtual museum tours at home.

Unable to connect with visitors in person due to the COVID-19 crisis, the British Museum recently updated its website with 300,000 new images. The online collection now features roughly half of the institution's catalog, with items spanning 2 million years of history from six continents. In addition to uploading the new materials, the museum has also revamped its archives to make it easier to search and view objects on tablets, mobile phones, and desktop computers.

The most iconic piece in the museum's collection is the . Even if you've seen it in person, the digital file is worth seeing for an up-close view of the artifact that's not normally accessible to the public. You can use the zoom tool to study the high-resolution photograph of the rock line by line. If you don't know what you're looking for, the British Museum also makes it easy to stumble upon new art as you would in the brick-and-mortar location. Curated online collections ready to be explored include ; ; and .

Rosetta Stone circa 196 BCE.
The Rosetta Stone.
© The Trustees of the British Museum //

Porcelain chocolate cups and saucers from late 18th-century England.
Porcelain chocolate cups and saucers from late 18th-century England.
© The Trustees of the British Museum //

Your virtual museum experience doesn't have to end when you leave the British Museum's website. Every photograph falls under a Creative Commons license, which means you can download them and save them to revisit whenever you like. For art lovers who prefer something more immersive than viewing individual image files, you can also tour the museum galleries virtually via . Here are more world-class museums to check out without leaving your living room.

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