美女视频黄频大全视频

10 Simple Ways to Reduce Food Waste

Learn how to make the most of your grocery haul.
Learn how to make the most of your grocery haul.
GANNAMARTYSHEVA/iStock via Getty Images

With the novel coronavirus majorly disrupting the food service industry, billions of dollars’ worth of food is going to waste as farmers face an overwhelming surplus of perishable items like dairy and fresh vegetables, according to a in The Guardian. Thanks to a supply chain, nearly half of the food grown in the United States that was previously destined for school cafeterias, restaurants, theme parks, cruise ships, and stadiums is going to waste, with farmers being forced to dump fresh milk and plow vegetables back into the dirt. To better preserve your own supplies—and save some serious cash—check out these 10 ways to reduce food waste at home.

1. Store your food properly.

Correctly storing your food will help it stay fresh longer. If your bread typically molds or goes stale before you have the chance to finish the loaf, keep half of it in the bread box and freeze the other half for later. Store potatoes and tomatoes at room temperature. Don’t stash your eggs in the refrigerator door compartment—this will rattle them around, and may lead to a yolky mess. You can find more helpful food storing tips here.

2. Get well-acquainted with your freezer.

Freezer packed with food
Stuffing your freezer means you can also pass time with a quality game of freezer Tetris.
mliu92, //

Leftovers, especially meals like soups or stews, are excellent for freezing. But you can freeze individual ingredients, too. Freeze wilted spinach to add to future soups. Frozen berries work well in smoothies, and frozen overripe bananas are perfect for banana bread. Keeping a bag of vegetable scraps in the freezer is a great way to ensure you’ll always have the ingredients for vegetable stock on hand (more on that later). However, there are you should never freeze, and there are certain things you when defrosting.

3. Learn the best way to freeze different kinds of fruit.

美女视频黄频大全视频Ripe, fairly unblemished fruit is for freezing. First, wash the fruit and sort through it for any pieces that are bruised or rotten. Some fruits, like blackberries, raspberries, and plums [], will freeze better with the help of a sugar solution, though cranberries, blueberries, and currants typically do fine on their own. Arrange more delicate berries like strawberries or raspberries in a single layer on a baking sheet (you can also coat them with sugar or a sugar syrup), and then once they’re frozen, put them in a container or a plastic freezer bag. Fruits that tend to brown, like peaches, apple, apricots, and nectarines, can be treated with ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), which you can purchase in powder form in health food stores and some grocery stores.

4. Follow the “first in, first out” rule.

Much like shelves are stocked in grocery stores, use the “first in, first out” method when stocking your refrigerator. After washing your produce and wiping down all other items, put the newer ingredients in the back of the fridge and move the older items to the front so they’ll get used first. A fridge cam can even help you keep track of what’s about to go bad or expire.

5. Keep your fridge uncluttered.

Woman standing in front of opened fridge pinching her nose
Maintaining an orderly fridge will help you spot spoiling food before it starts to stink.
millann/iStock via Getty Images

Having to rummage around for an item or not being able to see that bottle of cocktail sauce tucked behind the box o’ wine means more food may go bad before it’s used up. Periodically, take a look at the long-term residents of your fridge, like salad dressings and sauces, to see if they’re still good. If possible, keep them all in one spot to make keeping track of them easier. Also, use for leftovers rather than round ones, as the square shape allows for more storage space. Taking stock of everything you have in both the fridge and the pantry before shopping will also help cut down on clutter and double-buying.

6. Understand expiration dates.

Studies have shown that we throw away more than half美女视频黄频大全视频 of the food we keep in our refrigerators. Misunderstanding food labels is one reason behind the waste. “Sell by” is the date used to inform retailers when an item should be sold or removed from inventory. “Best by” is a suggested date that shoppers should use their products by. Neither means the item is unsafe to eat after that particular date. Even “” isn’t set in stone.

7. Use food scraps to make stock.

Using vegetable scraps like stalks, tops, and peels to make a tasty broth is simple. Sauté them in some butter or oil, then add water and let them simmer for a few hours. Simmer beef bones and chicken carcasses along with the veggies (add water and herbs) to make a delectable homemade .

8. Plan your meals in advance.

Knowing what you want to eat for just a few dinners or lunches per week can help you figure out which ingredients you can use across meals and help cut down on spontaneous buying. The Kitchn planning on a Friday, shopping on a Saturday, and then using an hour on Sunday for meal prep.

9. Shop strategically.

Grocery shopping list written with pen on paper from a notebook
For now, it's best to write your shopping list on paper you can later dispose of.
Santeri Viinamäki, //

Typically, more frequent trips to the grocery store are preferable to buying in bulk when it comes to cutting down on waste, but in these current circumstances, trips are your safest bet. Therefore, a list is essential—just make sure you're jotting your notes on paper美女视频黄频大全视频 and not touching your phone while shopping. And if there’s any way to order online for delivery or pick-up, keeping an open online shopping cart is the best way to organize and maintain a visual list.

10. Donate items you know you won’t use to your local food bank.

If you have more food on hand than you need, consider donating to a local shelter or food bank. Call ahead and arrange curbside drop off.

4 Helpful Tips for Freezing Food

hedgehog94/iStock via Getty Images Plus
hedgehog94/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Freezing food is a great way to extend its shelf life. You can freeze individual ingredients or preserve entire meals that can be reheated quickly. from the provided us some tips for freezing food safely.

1. To freeze most vegetables, cut them to size and then blanch.

Most vegetables (including broccoli, green beans, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts) should be blanched first to preserve color and flavor. First, cut the vegetables to the size you’ll want to cook/serve later. Then, boil briefly in salted water—how long depends on the type of vegetable and the size of the pieces, but for the vegetables we've mentioned here, (or until tender) should do the trick. Next, drain the vegetables and immediately cool in an ice bath, which stops the cooking process. Drain again.

Before your vegetables get anywhere near the freezer, make sure they're dry: The less water your ingredients retain, the better they’ll hold up in the freezer and resist harmful freezer burn. You can use a salad spinner to remove water and/or pat individual pieces dry with paper towels.

Next, spread the individual pieces out on a parchment-lined cookie sheet and freeze for around an hour. This will prevent them from turning into one big frozen clump in the freezer. Finally, store food in a freezer bag or airtight container, removing as much air as you can. You should only use plastic containers or tempered freezer-safe glass, like Pyrex.

How to Use After Freezing: Frozen vegetables can be used straight from the freezer. You may need to cook them slightly longer to get rid of any water they’ve retained, but they can be incorporated into stir-fries, soups, and other dishes quite successfully.

2. Skip blanching for tender vegetables and fruits.

美女视频黄频大全视频Tender greens like spinach can be frozen without blanching. Bell peppers and sliced or diced onions can, too—just clean and dry them as well as possible. Fruits can be frozen raw as well. Just spread them out on a parchment-lined cookie sheet and “pre-freeze” to avoid clumping. Then bag them, removing as much air as you can.

How to Use After Freezing:美女视频黄频大全视频 Fruits can be eaten or thrown into smoothies still frozen, or defrosted for a snack. You don’t want to defrost and then refreeze, though, so take out only the amount you’ll want to eat in one sitting.

3. Make sure soups and stews are cool before freezing.

Placing hot items in the freezer can raise the ambient temperature, which can cause issues like freezer burn if it leads to items unfreezing and refreezing—so let cooked soups and stews cool before placing them in the freezer.

For maximum safety, you want to cool the food as quickly as possible so it spends a minimal amount of time in the “danger zone” of temperature where bacteria can grow. To do this, you can divide hot items into smaller containers—more surface area means things will cool faster, so a flat freezer bag will cool faster than a deep pot or bowl.

美女视频黄频大全视频You can also use an ice bath to quickly bring down the temperature of prepared foods. Fill the sink (or a large bowl) with cold water, add ice, and dip the entire cooking vessel into the cold water, making sure the water level doesn’t rise high enough to get into your food. Stirring the hot food inside the cold water bath will reduce its temperature much faster than sitting out at room temperature or in the refrigerator.

How to Use After Freezing: Prepared foods like soups and stews can be heated up in a pot right from the freezer. You may need to microwave them for a few seconds to release them from their containers—otherwise just heat in a pot until they reach serving temperature.

4. Wrap meats with plastic and foil before freezing.

美女视频黄频大全视频Raw vacuum-sealed meat can be frozen as-is. Otherwise, wrap meat tightly with plastic wrap and foil. Don’t forget to label any items you won’t be able to identify later. Putting the dates on the foil will also help you remember what items are oldest, so you can use them first.

美女视频黄频大全视频Chef Frank also recommends sticking your newest items deep into the freezer. This will freeze them faster, and will also encourage you to first use the older items that are up front in the freezer.

美女视频黄频大全视频He also advises against packing your freezer too tightly. While modern freezers can be filled quite a bit, you still want to provide enough room for air to circulate—otherwise the back of the freezer will stay cold, while the front will get relatively warm quickly, especially if you’re repeatedly opening the freezer.

How to Use After Freezing: Frozen meat should be thawed in the refrigerator overnight. Large pieces of meat like a chicken may need two days in the fridge, while a large turkey could take three. The refrigerator provides a safer temperature for thawing compared to letting food sit out on the counter. If you need to speed up the process, you can run the frozen meat under cold water.

The Super Luxe History of Pineapples—And Why They Used to Cost $8000

baibaz/iStock via Getty Images
baibaz/iStock via Getty Images

Though native to South America, pineapples (scientific name: Ananas comosus) made their way to the Caribbean island of Guadeloupe, and it was here that Christopher Columbus first spotted their spiky crowns in 1493. Columbus and his crew took pineapples back to Spain, where everyone loved how sweet this new, exotic fruit tasted. They tried to grow them there, but because pineapples need a tropical climate to grow, Europeans didn’t get very far. The only pineapples they could get their hands on had to be imported from across the Atlantic Ocean, a time-consuming trek that often resulted in bruised, rotten fruit.

Later, in the mid 17th century, pineapples were in a few hothouses in England and the Netherlands, in conditions that mimicked the warm temperature and humidity levels needed to produce the fruit. Because they were in high demand and low in supply, only the extremely wealthy could afford pineapples. Monarchs such as Louis XV, Catherine the Great美女视频黄频大全视频, and Charles II (who even of his gardener presenting him with a pineapple) enjoyed eating the sweet fruit, and pineapples came to symbolize luxury and opulence.

In the American colonies in the 1700s, pineapples were no less revered. Imported from the Caribbean islands, pineapples that arrived in America were very expensive—one pineapple could cost as much as $8000 (in today’s dollars). This high cost was due to the perishability, novelty, exoticism, and scarcity of the fruit. Affluent colonists would throw dinner parties and display a pineapple as the centerpiece, a symbol of their wealth, hospitality, and status, instantly recognizable by a party’s guests. Pineapples, however, were mainly used for decoration at this time, and only eaten once they started going rotten.

To underscore just how lavish and extravagant pineapples were, consider the pineapple rental market. The fruit evoked such jealousy among the poor, pineapple-less plebs that people could, if they wished, pay to rent a pineapple for the night. Before selling them for consumption, pineapple merchants rented pineapples to people who couldn’t afford to purchase them. Those who rented would take the pineapple to parties, not to give as a gift to the host, but to carry around and show off their apparent ability to afford such an expensive fruit!

Throughout the 1700s and 1800s, artists depicted pineapples to symbolize hospitality and generosity. Napkins, tablecloths, wallpaper, and even bedposts were decorated with drawings and carvings of pineapples in order to make guests feel welcome. If people couldn’t afford to buy or rent the real fruit, they bought porcelain dishes and teapots in the shape of a pineapple, which became hugely popular starting in the 1760s. 

But fast-forward to 1900, when industrialist James Dole started a pineapple plantation in Hawaii, hoping to sell and distribute the fruit with his business, the Hawaiian Pineapple Company, which would later become the Dole Food Company. He was hugely successful—for seven decades, his produced more than 75 percent of the world's pineapples—and the company is still going strong. Love for the fruit hasn't waned either, and they are still a . And it's Dole who helped contribute to the pineapple’s evolution from overpriced, luxe commodity to accessible treat for the masses.