美女视频黄频大全视频

Vietnam Installs Innovative ‘Rice ATMs’ to Give Food to Local Residents

A "rice ATM" in Hanoi, Vietnam.
A "rice ATM" in Hanoi, Vietnam.
Linh Pham/Getty Images

Residents of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, are lining up on bright orange tiles—spaced 6 feet away from each other—to wait their turn at the “rice ATM,” a silo that dispenses uncooked white rice through a tube.

Travel + Leisure that the innovative machine was created by Vietnamese technology businessman Hoang Tuan Anh as a way to give citizens access to free food while they’re out of work. Vietnam, which has about 270 cases of COVID-19 (as of April 17), launched a 15-day period of nationwide isolation on March 31, causing many small businesses to close their doors and many workers to find themselves temporarily without a source of income. According to , occupations of those waiting in line at the rice ATM range from street vendors to housekeepers.

Nguyen Thi Ly, a 34-year-old mother of three whose husband just lost his job, told Reuters the service provides enough rice to feed her family for a day. Each recipient can fill their bag with up to 1.5 kilograms (about 3.3 pounds) of rice.

“I read about this rice ATM on the internet. I came to check it out, and couldn’t believe it came out for real,” she told Reuters. “I really hope the sponsors would keep doing this until the end of the pandemic.”

It’s not clear how long the rice ATM in Ho Chi Minh City will continue operating, but another one in Hanoi, Vietnam’s capital city, will stay open until the end of April or whenever it runs out of rice. Machines have been installed in other large cities like Hue and Danang, too.

Wondering how to help out in your own community during the coronavirus pandemic? Here are 7 things you can do.

[h/t ]

7 Early Attempts at Self-Driving Cars

Self-driving cars have captured the public's imagination for decades.
Self-driving cars have captured the public's imagination for decades.
GraphicaArtis/Getty Images

If automotive futurists are correct, we'll soon be living in a world where self-driving vehicles from Tesla and other carmakers transport us from one destination to another while we sit idle in the cabin. While this dream scenario seems to have taken off in recent years, engineers have actually been trying to accomplish autonomous cars since the early 20th century. Take a look at some fascinating—and sometimes misguided—attempts to take us out of the driver’s seat.

1. The Radio-Controlled Car That Led to Houdini’s Arrest

The 'American Wonder' radio-controlled car is pictured in 1925.
Francis Houdina's radio-controlled car, dubbed the "American Wonder," circa 1925.
//

Residents of New York City in the summer of 1925 were greeted with an unusual sight—a driverless vehicle ambling down Broadway. The modified Chandler sedan, dubbed the American Wonder, was the of Francis P. Houdina, a former U.S. Army electrical engineer. The American Wonder received radio signals via an antenna that controlled its speed and direction. A second vehicle containing the car’s operators trailed just behind it. The car could even honk its horn. While this glimpse of the future was intriguing, it ended somewhat ignobly when the American Wonder careened into a car containing a bunch of photographers.

The story has a strange epilogue. Famed escape artist Harry Houdini美女视频黄频大全视频 was reportedly so annoyed that Houdina’s publicity led to the public confusing the two of them—Houdina sometimes received mail intended for Houdini—that the magician and his secretary, Oscar Teale, were arrested for breaking into Houdina’s office to retrieve correspondence meant for Houdini. The charges were later dropped.

美女视频黄频大全视频Despite this peculiar wrinkle, various iterations of a “phantom” automobile operated by radio control for years, though not with consistent success. In 1932, a phantom car by engineer J.J. Lynch plowed into a crowd in Hanover, Pennsylvania, striking 12 people.

2. The Nebraska Test

美女视频黄频大全视频While radio-controlled vehicles by themselves ultimately proved insufficient, there was no shortage of other ways to get driverless vehicles moving on the road. In 1957, an was conducted on U.S. 77 near the Nebraska 2 intersection near Lincoln, Nebraska, that involved a Chevrolet being guided by wire coils located underneath the pavement. State traffic engineer Leland Hancock devised the method and enlisted electronics manufacturer RCA to aid in his attempts to automate vehicles. The project was in part by a 1939 World’s Fair concept of a driverless future as envisioned by industrialist Norman Bel Geddes. During the demonstration, an RCA representative used coils on the car’s bumper to communicate with the guide wire under the road. To prove the car was guided by the coils and radio transmission, the windshield was blacked out. Hancock believed this would be a viable method of driverless control, but the cost and effort in laying guide wire proved to be an insurmountable obstacle.

3. The Titanium Firebird

Believed to be the first car constructed entirely of titanium, the Firebird II from General Motors made a splash in 1956 when the carmaker proposed it could be by an electronic strip located under the road. A retractable steering wheel would disappear, the car over to a kind of autopilot system that would be overseen by traffic control towers similar to the kind found in the aviation industry. GM correctly predicted voice-activated features and display screens. The speculative effort hit the road for a in Princeton, New Jersey, in 1960 and never went far beyond that, though you can watch the excellent promotional video above.

4. The Aeromobile Arrives (Sort Of)

In 1961, Popular Science美女视频黄频大全视频 William Bertelsen, a physician who dabbled in engineering and developed a hovercraft vehicle. His Aeromobile would glide in “airways” rather than on highways and speed along at hundreds of miles an hour while drivers kicked back and read newspapers. Bertelsen actually an Aeromobile, dubbed the Aeromobile 35B, that used a downward rather than inward stream of air to propel itself, which allowed for better steering. His high-speed utopia of air cars, however, never materialized. Engineers in Britain were far ahead of the United States in the hovercraft field, minimizing American interest in the vehicles.

5. The Ghost Car

In attempting to test tire reliability in 1968, German carmaker Continental struck upon a method for driverless vehicle operation. The demonstration, which took place at the Contidrom test track in the Lüneburg Heath and was by Siemens, Westinghouse, and researchers at the Munich and Darmstadt universities, used a guide wire on the road. When the car veered away, sensors alerted the system and steered the car back into place. A control station could instruct the vehicle to brake and accelerate.

美女视频黄频大全视频The “e-car” was put into regular use on the track, which impressed observers by zipping around with no one behind the wheel. Sheets of glass along the track told the engineers how different tire treads responded to different conditions. The strategy was used through 1974.

6. The Ambulance of the Future

美女视频黄频大全视频In 1989, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University motored around campus using ALVINN, or Autonomous Land Vehicle In a Neural Network. The computer-powered vehicle, a former Army ambulance, had a CPU the size of a refrigerator and a 5000-watt generator for power. Essentially, the car could drive using the information stored on its network rather than rely on a predetermined grid in the environment. The former Army ambulance vehicle is thought to be a of the self-driving vehicle networks in use today. In 1995, the group took a 1990 Pontiac Trans Sport 3100 miles the country, steering autonomously while a human worked the brakes and hand throttle. 

7. The Car with Eyes

In 1994, German engineer Ernst Dickmanns saw his of a self-driving car realized when he was able to put two Mercedes 500 SEL limousines on a public road in Paris, France, that had no human operator. The cars had an onboard computer system controlling the wheels, gas, and brakes. Dickmanns’s work had stretched back to 1986, when he had outfitted a Mercedes van with a computer and cameras, allowing it to receive information like lane markings from the road. The work culminated with the test drive in actual traffic, with drivers on hand to take the wheel if needed. Though Dickmanns’s work much of the surveillance elements of today’s modern self-driving cars, his backers wanted more immediate results and eventually withdrew funding.

25 Amazing Books by Asian American and Pacific Islander Authors You Need to Read

Book covers courtesy the publishers below. Photo illustration by Shaunacy Ferro
Book covers courtesy the publishers below. Photo illustration by Shaunacy Ferro

May is Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month, which celebrates the lives and contributions of inspiring Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders through various mediums. In honor of the holiday, here are 25 books from Asian American and Pacific Islander authors that you should include on your reading list, from prize-winning fiction to graphic novels, essays, and memoirs.

1. The Sympathizer // Viet Thanh Nguyen

The cover of The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen
Grove Atlantic

The Sympathizer is Viet Thanh Nguyen’s debut novel, which earned him a Pulitzer Prize as well as a place on The New York Times Bestseller list. When Nguyen was 10 years old, he saw the film Apocalypse Now美女视频黄频大全视频, an American drama about the Vietnam War, and realized that not many stories about the war came from the perspective of the Vietnamese people.

In The Sympathizer, the unnamed narrator is a South Vietnamese military aid working as a spy for the communist North Vietnamese. Born to a French father and Vietnamese mother, this unnamed spy was educated in America, but has returned to his home country to fight for the communist cause. After the Fall of Saigon, he is among the refugees sent to the United States and tries to start a new life there, but is quickly recruited back to spy on his fellow comrades. The Washington Post has the novel “startlingly insightful and perilously candid.”

Buy it:

2. Pachinko // Min Jin Lee

The cover of 'Pachinko' by Min Jin Lee
Grand Central Publishing

Pachinko is a historical novel that follows four generations of a Korean family that migrates to Japan, following a large ensemble of characters who must deal with the legal and social discrimination they face as immigrants. In order to move up in society, the family opens up pachinko parlor, a slot machine style game popular in Japan, from which the book takes its name. Beautifully written and captivating, Pachinko美女视频黄频大全视频 was named one of the 10 best books of 2017 by and was a finalist for the National Book Award in Fiction.

Buy it:

3. Little Fires Everywhere // Celeste Ng

The cover of 'Little Fires Everywhere' by Celeste Ng
Penguin Random House

Set in the 1990s, Little Fires Everywhere tells the intertwined stories of the Richardsons, a middle-class suburban family in Shaker Heights, Ohio—where author Celeste Ng grew up—and single mother Mia Warren and her daughter Pearl. While Mia is a transient artist with a mysterious past, the Richardson household follows a strict set of rules and status quo. When the two families find themselves on opposing sides of a custody battle over the adoption of a Chinese baby, secrets are revealed and lives are changed forever. In the process, Little Fires Everywhere explores the power of privilege and the societal demands on motherhood.

Buy it:

4. Clay Walls // Ronyoung Kim

The cover of 'Clay Walls' by Ronyoung Kim
Permanent Press

The Pulitzer Prize-nominated novel Clay Walls tells the story of a Korean family forced to leave Japanese-occupied Korea in the 1920s to live in the United States. As Pachinko author Min Jin Lee recently described it to , “Clay Walls is a story about immigration and colonial trauma, and it is also a story about marriage, class, and patriarchy." Published in 1986, the book was the first-ever American novel to explore the social and cultural situations of Korean immigrants in the early 20th century, and had a major impact on later generations of Asian-American authors. "At the time, I did not think I could be a writer, so I did not read it as a lofty literary example," Lee told Bustle, "rather, I read it and loved it because it was a beautifully written work of American literature that was both absorbing and deeply felt.”

Buy it:

5. The Namesake // Jhumpa Lahiri

The cover of 'The Namesake' by Jhumpa Lahiri
Mariner Books

Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake brings the immigrant experience and the idea of identity to light in this story of the Ganguli family leaving Calcutta for the United States. After their arranged marriage, Ashoke and Ashima move to Cambridge, Massachusetts, for Ashoke’s career in engineering. As Ashoke adapts to the American way of life, Ashima resists the lifestyle and pines to be back home with her family. The story then follows their son Gogol as he struggles between following his family’s tradition or assimilating to U.S. culture—an experience that many first-generation American children deal with.

Buy it:

6. Girls Burn Brighter // Shobha Rao

The cover of 'Girls Burn Brighter' by Shobha Rao
Flatiron Books

Set in India, Shobha Rao’s debut novel follows Poornima and Savita, friends who are born in an impoverished landscape where they endure daily abuse. They are separated after a devastating assault on Savita. Poornima becomes determined to find her friend and leaves everything behind. Her journey takes her to the dark underworld of India and then to a tiny apartment in Seattle, Washington. Girls Burn Brighter美女视频黄频大全视频 is a timely—if distressing—portrayal of human trafficking, sexual assault, misogyny, cultural patriarchy, and the power of friendship.

Buy it:

7. I Love You So Mochi // Sarah Kuhn

The cover of 'I Love You So Mochi' by Sarah Kuhn
Scholastic

美女视频黄频大全视频In this coming-of-age story for young adults, Kuhn explores themes of food, fashion, family, cultural differences, and love. The sweet romantic comedy follows Kimi Nakamura as she visits her estranged grandparents in Japan during spring break after getting into a fight with her mother. While there, Kimi meets Akira, a cute medical student who moonlights as a Mochi mascot, and he ends up serving as her guide in Kyoto. What begins as an escape from her problems becomes a way for Kimi to understand her mother’s past and figure out her own future.

Buy it:

8. The Woman Warrior // Maxine Hong Kingston

The cover of 'The Woman Warrior' by Maxine Hong Kingston
Penguin Random House

Told across five interconnected stories, The Woman Warrior blends autobiography and Cantonese mythology to explore Kingston’s identity as a first-generation Chinese American woman. Kingston focuses on the women that have affected her life the most—from her aunts to her mother to the Chinese folk hero Fa Mulan and finally to Kingston herself. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction, The Woman Warrior has become a staple in Asian American Studies classes since it was first published in 1976.

Buy it:

9. Pidgin Eye // Joe Balaz

The cover of 'Pidgen Eye' by Joe Balaz
Joe Balaz

If you want to learn about Hawaiian culture, start with Joe Balaz, a Native Hawaiian poet and visual artist best known for his writing in English and Pidgin (Hawaiian Creole English). His collection Pidgin Eye美女视频黄频大全视频 features 35 years of poetry honoring the beauty and complexity of Hawaii and its people. Balaz’s poems are funny, spiritual, and full of Hawaiian history.

Buy it:

10. All You Can Ever Know: A Memoir // Nicole Chung

The cover of 'All You Can Ever Know' by Nicole Chung
Catapult

This memoir by magazine editor-in-chief (and former managing editor of ) Nicole Chung is a warm and honest reflection on the author's search for the birth parents who gave her up for adoption. After asking her adoptive mother about her birth parents, Chung is told that they could not give her the life she deserved and that "may be all you can ever know." As Chung prepares for the birth of her first child, she seeks out her birth parents and finds an older sister as well as some painful family secrets. All You Can Ever Know was a finalist for the 2018 National Books Critics Circle Award and named a Best Book of the Year that year by The Washington Post, NPR, TIME, and many more.

Buy it:

11. Language of the Geckos and Other Stories // Gary Yong Ki Pak

The cover of 'Language of the Geckos' by Gary Pak
University of Washington Press

Writer Gary Pak is considered one of the most popular and influential writers of Hawaiian heritage of the modern era. Many of his stories focus on Asian-Hawaiian identity and the complexities of Hawaiian culture. Language of the Geckos and Other Stories features stories of Native Hawaiians and Asian Americans (as well as haole美女视频黄频大全视频, or white people) dealing with unfulfilled dreams, failure, and the loss of love.

Buy it:

12. Patron Saints of Nothing // Randy Ribay

The cover of 'Patron Saints of Nothing' by Randy Ribay
Penguin Random House

In this young adult novel, author Randy Ribay dives deep into Filipino and American identity, drug abuse, guilt, grief, and the unjust policies of current Filipino president Rodrigo Duterte. After the death of his cousin at the hands of the Duterte regime, Filipino American Jay Reguero is determined to find out what happened. Jay travels to the Philippines, where he finds out more than he bargained for.

Buy it:

13. The Astonishing Color of After // Emily X.R. Pan

The cover of 'The Astonishing Color of After' by Emily X.R. Pan
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

美女视频黄频大全视频After her mother dies by suicide, Leigh is convinced her mother has been reincarnated as a red bird. She travels to Taiwan to meet her mother’s parents for the first time, and while there, she seeks out her mother’s past, uncovers family secrets, and build a new relationship with her grandparents. At the same time, Leigh must come to terms with her relationship with her best friend and longtime crush, Axel, whom she kissed for the first time the day of her mother’s passing. Pan explores mental illness, grief, and love in this heartbreaking story.

Buy it:

14. Edinburgh // Alexander Chee

The cover of 'Edinburgh' by Alexander Chee
Picador

美女视频黄频大全视频Alexander Chee’s semi-autobiographical debut novel is about a boys’ choir in Maine and the sexual abuse its members suffer at the hands of their choir director. The harrowing tale of sexual abuse, resilience, and redemption is guaranteed to leave a powerful impact. In fact, its publication helped Chee to enter therapy for the first time.

Buy it:

15. To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before // Jenny Han

The cover of 'To All the Boys I've Loved Before' by Jenny Han
Simon & Schuster

Whenever Lara Jean has a crush on a boy, she writes a letter to him telling him how she feels, but she doesn’t send the letter. Instead, she seals and locks them away in a box under her bed. One day, Lara Jeans discovers that these letters have been mailed out, meaning all the boys she’s ever had crushes on received them, including her sister’s ex-boyfriend, Josh. In this debut novel (recently adapted into a hit Netflix film), Jenny Han writes beautifully about the importance of sisterhood, falling in love, and finally taking some risks in life.

Buy it:

16. Marriage of a Thousand Lies // SJ Sindu

The cover of 'Marriage of a Thousand Lies' by SJ Sindu
Penguin Random House

In writing Marriage of a Thousand Lies美女视频黄频大全视频, SJ Sindu wanted to explore a topic that isn't typically talked about in South Asian American fiction—queer identity. The novel follows Lucky and her husband, who are both gay, and lying to their Sri Lankan families about it. After Lucky’s grandmother suffers an accident, Lucky returns to her childhood home and reconnects with her first love, Nisha, who is preparing for an arranged marriage with a man she’s never met. Throughout the book, Sindu tackles what it means to be queer and South Asian American.

Buy it:

17. Internment // Samira Ahmed

The cover of 'Internment' by Samira Ahmed
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Inspired by the uptick in anti-Muslim hate crimes and Islamaphobic rhetoric in the United States that followed the November 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris, Samira Ahmed's Internment imagines a not-too-distant future in which Muslim American citizens are rounded up and forced into internment camps. In this timely novel, Layla Amin and her family are forced into one of these camps in the California desert. Layla is determined to take down the system, leading a revolution inside the camp.

Buy it:

18. The Kiss Quotient // Helen Hoang

The cover of 'The Kiss Quotient' by Helen Hoang
Penguin Random House

Helen Hoang’s 2018 debut novel, The Kiss Quotient, is about Stella, a math genius with Asperger’s who isn’t great at intimacy and relationships. This is why she hires an escort, Michael, to teach her a thing or two about sex. Of course, it doesn’t take long for them to realize their relationship is more than just what happens inside the bedroom.

Buy it:

19. Where Reasons End // Yiyun Lee

The cover of 'Where Reasons End' by Yiyun Lee
Penguin Random House

Where Reasons End takes the form of a painful and honest conversation between a mother and a son. Written after the death of her own son by suicide, Yiyun Lee creates a space between life and death where the narrator and her son talk about memories, grief, love, and longing. The novel is a stunning exploration of grief and loss that is likely to leave you in tears.

Buy it:

20. The Leavers // Lisa Ko

The cover of 'The Leavers' by Lisa Ko
Workman Publishing

Lisa Ko was inspired to write The Leavers after reading a 2009 article about an undocumented Chinese immigrant in America []. Several years after sneaking into the United States on a boat from China, this woman tried to bring her son to the U.S. to join her. But he was caught by authorities while trying to cross the border from Canada and placed into the Canadian foster care system, where he was adopted out to a Canadian family. The Leavers tells the story of Polly, an undocumented Chinese immigrant who disappears, leaving her 11-year-old son Deming all alone. He is eventually adopted by a white couple and is left to wonder where his place is in the world. Ko’s powerful debut was National Book Award finalist in 2017.

Buy it:

21. American Born Chinese // Gene Yuen Yang

The cover of 'American Born Chinese' by Gene Luen Yang
Square Fish

Winner of the 2007 Eisner Award for Best Graphic Album, Gene Yuen Yang’s graphic novel American Born Chinese weaves together three seemingly independent stories of Chinese folklore, self-acceptance, and cultural assimilation. Told through the eyes of Jin Wang, an all-American white teen named Danny, and the Chinese folk legend the Monkey King, Yang breaks down the insecurities of growing up Chinese American and dealing with issues of identity and self-worth. While the three stories seem unrelated, they are later revealed to be connected in a surprising twist.

Buy it:

22. America is Not the Heart // Elaine Castillo

The cover of 'American Is Not the Heart' by Elaine Castillo
Penguin Random House

Elaine Castillo examines today’s suburban Filipino migrant community in this ode to Carlos Bulosan’s 1946 tale America Is in the Heart. Castillo's America Is Not the Heart tells the story of Hero, a former doctor from the Philippines who immigrates to the United States after joining the New People’s Army, an insurgent Communist guerrilla group, and being disowned by her immediate family. Living with her uncle’s family, Hero is slowly coming to terms with what happened in her past with the help of her cousin, a potential love interest named Rosalyn, and the Filipino-American美女视频黄频大全视频 community.

Buy it:

23. Falling Leaves: The Memoir of an Unwanted Chinese Daughter // Adeline Yen Mah

The cover of 'Falling Leaves' by Adeline Yen Mah
Penguin Random House

Considered unlucky by her family after her mother dies giving birth to her, Adeline Yen Mah tells her Cinderella story in Falling Leaves. Her father remarries a beautiful yet cruel woman. Yen Mah and her siblings are mistreated, but Yen Mah takes the brunt of the cruelty. Determined to get away, Yen Mah works hard to be an exceptional student and is eventually allowed to study medicine in England. She later finds success and happiness in the United States, but must return to China after the death of her father and deal with her wicked stepmother once again. The Washington Post called the story of family cruelty and resilience “painful and lovely, at once heartbreaking and heartening,” leaving the reviewer to wonder how Yen Mah survived to tell the tale.

Buy it:

24. Somewhere Only We Know // Maurene Goo

The cover of 'Somewhere Only We Know' by Maurene Goo
Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)

A contemporary take on the 1953 romantic comedy Roman Holiday, Somewhere Only We Know tells the story of Lucky, a popular Korean pop star who, after playing a big concert in Hong Kong, escapes her handlers in search of a hamburger. High on anti-anxiety medication and sleeping pills, she encounters Jack, a tabloid reporter looking for his next story. Together, they travel around Hong Kong and begin to fall for each other, but both are keeping their own secrets. Goo immerses the readers into the world of K-pop and life in Hong Kong and captivates us with her witty banter and charming story.

Buy it:

25. It’s Not Like It’s A Secret // Misa Sugiura

The cover of 'It's Not Like It's a Secret' by Misa Sugiura
HarperCollins Publishers

美女视频黄频大全视频In this YA romance, teenager Sana Kiyohara is dealing with a lot—her mother’s subtle racism, her father’s infidelity, and her crush on a friend who happens to be a girl. The coming-of-age story tackles the intersections of identity, racism, cultural expectations, and coming out, and author Misa Sugiura doesn't hold back.

Buy it:

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.