美女视频黄频大全视频

21 Phrases You Use Without Realizing You're Quoting William Shakespeare

CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

William Shakespeare devised new words美女视频黄频大全视频 and countless plot tropes that still appear in everyday life. Famous quotes from his plays are easily recognizable; phrases like "To be or not to be," "wherefore art thou, Romeo," and "et tu, Brute?" instantly evoke images of wooden stages and Elizabethan costumes. But an incredible number of lines from his plays have become so ingrained into modern vernacular that we no longer recognize them as lines from plays at all. Here are 21 phrases you use but may not have known came from the Bard of Avon.

1. "WILD GOOSE CHASE" // ROMEO AND JULIET, ACT II, SCENE IV

pop art
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

"Nay, if our wits run the wild-goose chase, I am done, for thou hast more of the wild-goose in one of thy wits than, I am sure, I have in my whole five. Was I with you there for the goose?" — Mercutio

美女视频黄频大全视频This term didn't originally refer to actual geese, but rather a .

2. "GREEN-EYED MONSTER" // OTHELLO, ACT III, SCENE III

pop art
CSA Images/iStock via Getty Images

"O, beware, my lord, of jealousy! It is the green-eyed monster, which doth mock the meat it feeds on." — Iago

Before Shakespeare, the color green was most commonly associated with illness. Shakespeare turned the notion of being sick with jealousy into a metaphor that we still use today.

3. "PURE AS THE DRIVEN SNOW" // HAMLET, ACT III, SCENE I AND THE WINTER'S TALE, ACT IV, SCENE IV

pop art
CSA Images/iStock via Getty Images

"Be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny. Get thee to a nunnery, go." — Hamlet

"Lawn as white as driven snow." — Autolycus

Though Shakespeare never actually used the full phrase "pure as the driven snow," both parts of it appear in his work. For the record, this simile works best right after the snow falls, and not a few hours later when tires and footprints turn it into brown slush.

4. "SEEN BETTER DAYS" // AS YOU LIKE IT, ACT II, SCENE VII

art pop
CSA Images/iStock via Getty Images

"True is it that we have seen better days and have with holy bell been knolled to church, and sat at good men's feasts and wiped our eyes of drops that sacred pity hath engendered." — Duke Senior

The first recorded use of "seen better days" actually appeared in Sir Thomas More in 1590, but the play was written anonymously, and is often at least partially attributed to Shakespeare. We do know Shakespeare was a fan of the phrase; he uses "seen better days" in As You Like It, and then again in Timon of Athens.

5. "OFF WITH HIS HEAD" // RICHARD III, ACT III, SCENE IV

pop art
drante/iStock via Getty Images

"If? Thou protector of this damnèd strumpet, talk'st thou to me of "ifs"? Thou art a traitor—Off with his head." — Richard III

The Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland美女视频黄频大全视频 wasn't the first monarch with a penchant for liberating heads from bodies. Her famous catchphrase came from Shakespeare first.

6. "FOREVER AND A DAY" // AS YOU LIKE IT, ACT IV, SCENE I

pop art
SA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

"Now tell me how long you would have her after you have possessed her." — Rosalind

"Forever and a day" — Orlando

We have the Bard to thank for this perfect fodder for Valentine's Day cards and middle school students' love songs.

7. "GOOD RIDDANCE" // TROILUS AND CRESSIDA, ACT II, SCENE I

Pop art
drante/iStock via Getty Images

[Thersites exits]

"A good riddance." — Patroclus

美女视频黄频大全视频Where would be without Shakespeare’s riposte? In addition to acoustic ballad titles, "good riddance" also applies well to exes, house pests (both human and insect), and in-laws.

8. "FAIR PLAY" // THE TEMPEST, ACT V, SCENE I

pop art
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

"Yes, for a score of kingdoms you should wrangle, and I would call it fair play." — Miranda

美女视频黄频大全视频Prospero's daughter never would have been able to predict that "fair play" is used more often now in sports than it is for the negotiation of kingdoms.

9. "LIE LOW" // MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, ACT V, SCENE I

pop art
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

"If he could right himself with quarreling, some of us would lie low." — Antonio

Shakespeare's plays contain brilliant wisdom that still applies today. In "lie low," he concocted the perfect two-word PR advice for every celebrity embroiled in a scandal.

10. "IT'S GREEK TO ME" // JULIUS CAESAR, ACT I, SCENE II

pop art
CSA Images/iStock via Getty Images

"Nay, an I tell you that, Ill ne'er look you i' the face again: but those that understood him smiled at one another and shook their heads; but, for mine own part, it was Greek to me." — Casca

"It's all Greek to me” might possibly be the most intelligent way of telling someone that you have absolutely no idea what's going on.

11. "AS GOOD LUCK WOULD HAVE IT" // THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR, ACT III, SCENE V

art pop
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

“As good luck would have it, comes in one Mistress Page; gives intelligence of Ford's approach; and, in her invention and Ford's wife's distraction, they conveyed me into a buck-basket.” — Falstaff

美女视频黄频大全视频Determining whether a Shakespeare play is a comedy or a tragedy can largely be boiled down to whether good luck would have anything for the characters.

12. "YOU'VE GOT TO BE CRUEL TO BE KIND" // HAMLET, ACT III, SCENE IV

pop art
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

"So, again, good night. I must be cruel only to be kind. Thus bad begins and worse remains behind." — Hamlet

Here’s an idiom that proves just because a character in a Shakespeare play said it doesn't necessarily mean it's always true. Hamlet probably isn't the best role model, especially given the whole accidentally-stabbing-someone-behind-a-curtain thing.

13. "LOVE IS BLIND" // THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, ACT II, SCENE VI

pop art
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

"But love is blind, and lovers cannot see the pretty follies that themselves commit, for if they could Cupid himself would blush to see me thus transformèd to a boy." — Jessica

Chaucer actually wrote the phrase ("For loue is blynd alday and may nat see") in The Merchant’s Tale in 1405, but it didn't become popular and wasn't seen in print again until Shakespeare wrote it down. Now, "love is blind" serves as the three-word explanation for any seemingly unlikely couple.

14. "BE-ALL, END-ALL" // MACBETH, ACT I, SCENE VII

art pop
iStock via Getty Images

"If the assassination could trammel up the consequence, and catch with his surcease success; that but this blow might be the be-all and the end-all here, but here, upon this bank and shoal of time, we’d jump the life to come." — Macbeth

美女视频黄频大全视频Macbeth uses the phrase just as he’s thinking about assassinating King Duncan and, ironically, as anyone who's familiar with the play knows, the assassination doesn't turn out to be the "end all" after all.

15. "BREAK THE ICE" // THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, ACT I, SCENE II

pop art
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

"If it be so, sir, that you are the man must stead us all, and me amongst the rest, and if you break the ice and do this feat, achieve the elder, set the younger free for our access, whose hap shall be to have her will not so graceless be to be ingrate." — Tranio (as Lucentio)

If you want to really break the ice, the phrase appears to have come from Thomas North, whose translation of Plutarch's Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans provided for Shakespeare's ancient word plays. This is a great meta "did you know" fact for getting to know someone at speed dating.

16. "HEART OF GOLD" // HENRY V, ACT IV, SCENE I

pop art
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

"The king's a bawcock, and a heart of gold, a lad of life, an imp of fame, of parents good, of fist most valiant." — Pistol

Turns out, the phrase "heart of gold" existed before Douglas Adams used it as the name of the first spaceship to use the Infinite Improbability Drive in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

17. "KILL WITH KINDNESS" // THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, ACT IV, SCENE 1

pop art
CSA Images/iStock via Getty Images

"This is a way to kill a wife with kindness, and thus I'll curb her mad and headstrong humor." — Petruchio

The Shakespeare canon would contain a lot fewer dead bodies if his characters all believed they should kill their enemies with kindness instead of knives and poison.

18. "KNOCK, KNOCK! WHO'S THERE?" // MACBETH, ACT II, SCENE III

art pop
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

"Knock, knock! Who's there, in th' other devil’s name?" — Porter

Though high school students suffering through English class may disagree, Shakespeare was a master of humor in his works, writing both slapstick comedy and sophisticated wordplay. And, as the Porter scene in Macbeth美女视频黄频大全视频 illustrates, he's also the father of the knock-knock joke.

19. "LIVE LONG DAY" // JULIUS CAESAR, ACT I, SCENE I

art pop
CSA-Printstock/iStock via Getty Images

"To towers and windows, yea, to chimney tops, your infants in your arms, and there have sat the livelong day with patient expectation to see great Pompey pass the streets of Rome." — Mureless

Today, the phrase "live long day" is pretty much exclusively reserved for those who have been working on the railroad.

20. "YOU CAN HAVE TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING" // AS YOU LIKE IT, ACT IV, SCENE I

pop art
CSA Images/iStock via Getty Images

"Why then, can one desire too much of a good thing?— Come, sister, you shall be the priest and marry us.—Give me your hand, Orlando.—What do you say, sister?" — Rosalind

Modern readers often call Shakespeare a visionary, far ahead of his time. For example: he was able to write about desiring too much of a good thing 400 years before chocolate-hazelnut spread was widely available.

21. "THE GAME IS AFOOT" // HENRY V, ACT III, SCENE I

pop art
iStock

"The game's afoot: follow your spirit, and upon this charge cry 'God for Harry, England, and Saint George!'" — King Henry V

Nope! It wasn't Sir Arthur Conan Doyle who coined this phrase—Sherlock Holmes' most famous catchphrase comes from Henry V, although both characters do often tend to find themselves around dead bodies.

This story has been updated for 2020.

Yale Is Offering Its 'Science of Well-Being' Course for Free Online

Chainarong Prasertthai/iStock via Getty Images
Chainarong Prasertthai/iStock via Getty Images

Even if you’ve heard that money or career success won’t necessarily make you happier美女视频黄频大全视频, it’s still hard to resist the impulse to correlate your own well-being to external factors like those. Why are we so bad at predicting what will make us happy, and how can we figure out what actually does the trick?

These are just a couple questions you’ll be able to answer after completing “The Science of Well-Being,” a Yale University course currently being offered for on Coursera. According to , the 10-week course consists of about two to three hours of reading and videos per week, and you can work at your own pace—so you can definitely take advantage of a free weekend to fly through a few weeks’ worth of material at a time, or postpone a lesson if you’re swamped with other work.

The class is taught by Yale psychology professor Laurie Santos, who will lead students through relevant research on how we’re wired to think about our own well-being and teach you how to implement that knowledge to increase happiness in your life. Since the coursework is task-oriented and the course itself is aimed at helping you build more productive habits, it’s an especially good opportunity for anyone who feels a little overwhelmed at how vague a goal to “be happier” can seem.

美女视频黄频大全视频As for proof that this is definitely an undertaking worth 20 hours of your time, we’ll let the previous students speak for themselves: From 3731 ratings, the course averages 4.9 out of 5 stars.

Though the course is free, an official certificate to mark your completion—which you can then add to your LinkedIn profile—will cost you $50. Enroll on the Coursera , and check out 23 other science-backed ways to feel happier here.

At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

[h/t ]

11 New Words and Phrases Inspired by the Coronavirus

New words and phrases are popping up to help us describe living in the time of COVID-19.
New words and phrases are popping up to help us describe living in the time of COVID-19.
vectorplusb/iStock via Getty Images Plus

If you’re struggling to describe the new coronavirus美女视频黄频大全视频 era we’re living in, well, you’re not alone. In fact, many new words and phrases have been coined to help us talk about these unprecedented times (itself a phrase that has seen a huge spike in usage). The language experts at sent us a few of the new coronavirus-inspired words that humanity is adding to its covidictionary.

1. Coronaspeck

One of Mental Floss’s favorite German words, kummerspeck, literally translates to “grief bacon,” and it refers to the weight you gain due to overeating when you’re emotional. According to the experts at Babbel, “In German, the word speck is used to refer to the bacon-like pork fat found in a bratwurst (sausage).” But when pairing speck with corona, Germans have created “an expression for the weight gained in lockdown.”

2. Dracula Cough and Sneeze

Preschool teachers tell their students to cough or sneeze hygienically into their , and the phrase “cough and sneeze like Dracula美女视频黄频大全视频” basically means the same thing: Make like Dracula raising his cape to cover his face and sneeze in your elbow.

3. Covidiota

This Spanish term was coined online, according to the experts at Babbel, and can apply “to anyone who isn’t following lockdown rules, such as those who are still meeting friends, having parties, or sharing drinks—and everything else in between.” In English, you’d say covidiot.

4. Zumped

Forget about ghosting. Zumped is the new COVID-inspired phrase for breaking up with someone over video chat.

5. On-nomi

Bars are closed, but friends are still finding a way to enjoy happy hour—only now, they do it via video chat. The Japanese have created a word for this new coronavirus activity: on-nomi, which literally means “drink online.”

6. Quarantini

The English word for what you’re drinking while you’re sitting at home. According to the Babbel experts, “In the U.S, this drink comes with a specific recipe: a martini of vodka and gin mixed with Emergen-C vitamin powder, to calm your nerves and boost your immune system at the same time.”

7. Zoom Bombing

This term refers to the unwanted presence of a person on a video chat, usually in the meeting program Zoom. “It’s the photobombing of the coronavirus age,” the Babbel experts explain. “Whether you use this term to describe a complete stranger entering your work’s video meeting, or the friend you didn’t want to see inviting themselves to your digital get-together, is up to you entirely.”

8. Spendemic

This word—which was, the Babbel experts say, coined by The New York Post美女视频黄频大全视频—refers to the increase in online shopping during the pandemic.

9. Coronials

According to the Babbel experts, coronials is the term being used for the babies who will be born after lockdown: “Coronials began trending on social media when social media users wondered if the pandemic could cause an increase in birth rate since more time spent in the home could lead to slightly bigger families in the future.”

10. Quaranbaking

Some are making quarantinis during lockdown; others are finding comfort in quaranbaking美女视频黄频大全视频. This term, which reportedly trended on Twitter, is all about "the therapeutic act of baking during lockdown," according to the Babbel experts.

11. Hamsterkauf

Feel free to use this German term the next time you see shoppers frantically grabbing toilet paper off of store shelves. “The German words Hamster (hamster) and Kauf (buying) are joined metaphorically, to compare supermarket raiders to hamsters, who stock up food for an entire winter by stuffing their cheeks full of it,” the Babbel experts explain. “If you’ve seen someone hoarding bottles of water or buying three times the amount of ravioli they usually would, then you’ve come across a hamsterkauf.